<p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; line-height: 11.5px; font: 10.0px FranklinGothic;">Hattie Lewis kneels in front of the brick bought for her when she was born. McClure&rsquo;s PTA wants individuals to buy bricks to help beautify the east side of the school.</p>
<p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; text-align: right; font: 6.0px Chicago;">Jeff Bond &ndash; Queen Anne &amp; Magnolia News</p>

Hattie Lewis kneels in front of the brick bought for her when she was born. McClure’s PTA wants individuals to buy bricks to help beautify the east side of the school.

Jeff Bond – Queen Anne & Magnolia News

   McClure Middle School is asking for the community’s help in beautifying the east side of the Queen Anne school.

   The school was awarded a $20,000 matching grant from the City of Seattle Dept. of Neighborhoods to help landscape and beautify the east side of the school where the buses pull in. 

   You can help support the project and leave a lasting impression by purchasing an engraved brick for $50, to be permanently installed at the site this summer.  

The aim of the project is to convert the current worn, dusty area next to McClure along First Avenue West into an attractive block with brick pavers, concrete benches, and new plantings. 

   McClure students will be creating mosaic paving stones to be incorporated into the design. The design for the project was created by architect Greg Bjarko, a McClure parent, and is intended to harmonize with the paving on the north side of the building. The project would benefit not only the school but also the entire surrounding community, because the targeted area is a central route to and from the shops on Queen Anne Avenue, the community center and pool, and the ball fields and playground at Big Howe. 

    Currently, the site contains a sidewalk and strips of grass next to the building. The beautification plan calls for continuing the tiling project that was completed on the north side of the school along the eastside.

   It will include bricks bought by individuals or businesses that will include names or sayings. The entire project is estimated to cost about $40,000. 

   The City of Seattle Department of Neighborhoods has given the school a grant of $20,000 to help start the program. The PTSA has committed to match that amount through cash and volunteer labor to complete the project.